Right of Way (ROW) Debris Collection and Curbside Segregation

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Simultaneously during the “First Push” Amerigreen will mobilize personnel, crews and use the aforementioned initial damage assessment to decide where to prioritize the greatest needs.  Strategic meeting with the jurisdiction and all collection crews are performed to maintain specific requests and handle specific needs quickly and appropriately.  Debris operations are restricted to the publicly owned and maintained rights of way.  (PAPPG and FEMA Disaster Assistance Policy 9823.13) “Generally, debris removal from private property following a disaster is the responsibility of the individual property owner.  However, large scale disasters may deposit enormous quantities of debris on private property over a large area resulting in widespread immediate threats to the public at large.  In these instances, the state and local governments may need to enter private property to remove debris to: eliminate threats to life, public health and safety; eliminate immediate threats of significant damage to improved property or ensure economic recovery of the community to the benefit of the community at large.”  (44 CFR 206.224) In addition, Amerigreen follows all aspects of the PAPPG for the Public Assistance Program including its “CLEAN AS YOU GO“ policy.  Vegetative debris is segregated from non-eligible and eligible debris to the best extent possible at the loading site.  Construction and Demolition (C&D) debris, mixed debris, and other non-hazardous debris is separated further at the disposal site.

 

Curbside segregation of debris is required if not previously accomplished by homeowners.  Categories include household garbage, construction debris, vegetative debris, household garbage, white goods and electronics.  With over 30 years of experience AGER’s crew leaders have developed to offer the highest degree of efficient, professional and safe responders in the industry.  A normal crew consists of a Supervisor, two laborers and a loader operator.  All supplied with proper PPE. 

 

Tree Crews generally follow the same guidelines as far as equipment and insurance requirements are concerned, However, additional requirements are placed on the personnel and crews.  For example, tree trimmers must be certified by ANSI and/or ENRAT.  Each crew must have at least one member certified in aerial rescue.  Further each crew must have at least one member certified in first aid/CPR.  Finally, each bucket truck must have a current dielectric test certifying its safety and serviceability.

Close coordination with FEMA is required with any aspect of the Public Assistance Program.  While private gated communities and businesses are generally ineligible for debris removal services, services may be provided pursuant to 44 CFR 206.224 as outlined hereinabove.  Even then, unimproved property, including farmland, is rarely approved for services.  Based on the above and foregoing, the general parameters of any debris mission would include debris removal from designated rights of way to include debris placed on the right of way by the landowners of improved property along the right of way.  As discussed in mission planning, each jurisdiction is divided into areas, sectors and/or zones.  AMERI-GREEN prides itself on its flexibility and ability to draw and or modify zones in accordance with the Client’s needs.  For example, the use of major highways, railroads, rivers and streams and other such land marks may facilitate an easy division of the jurisdictional area.  However, the Client may desire to establish work areas based on council  districts, zip codes or a variety of other parameters.  Regardless of the actual parameters employed, AMERI-GREEN will prepare the necessary maps that are provided to the crews defining specific work assignments and responsibilities.  By using the mapping system, Clients can track the progress of recovery by each street, zone and/or  County.  Once a crew is assigned to a specific area, sector or zone, it remains their responsibility regardless of the number of scheduled passes.  The pattern of passes continues until a declaration is issued by the monitoring agency and approved by the Client that debris operations are complete.  With each mission, AMERI-GREEN requires that maintenance crews remain available to perform debris removal from areas designated complete until final close out of the mission. 

           

As just mentioned, AMERI-GREEN provides maintenance crews for removing debris from areas previously declared complete or as immediate response crews for hot spots identified by the client.  As part of that service, AMERI-GREEN employees on board computer systems to track and map debris piles.  For example, as an area supervisor passes through a completed zone and observes debris, he merely needs to “click” at the address, type of debris, and quantity of debris.  A map Ameri-Green will appear and be retained for later use.  At the end of the day, the maps are then down loaded and printed and crews dispatched to the specific addresses where the debris is located.  This procedure maximizes productivity while at the same time minimizing traffic in congested residential neighborhoods. 

           

AMERI-GREEN is well known for its ability to manage and organize its assets in performance of the debris mission.  AMERI-GREEN employs the National Incident Management System and Incident Command System unity of command and change of command principles.  More particularly, each area or sector, defined geographically, will have a designated manager or supervisor in charge.  The operations manager, who reports to the project manager, oversees these supervisors.  The area supervisors are responsible for the crews working in their designated sectors or zones.  While NIMS/ICS suggest a ratio of 1 to 5 or 1 to 7, the USACE recommended 1 to 10 crews per supervisor has been adopted in debris missions. Each of these supervisors will also have training in quality control and safety and will be equipped with substantial communication capability. 

           

It can be anticipated that work crews will encounter various types of debris.  Included within the scope of any debris mission are white goods, electronic waste, small engines, household hazardous waste, putrescible waste, dead animals, medical waste, and several other specialty wastes.  Many of AMERI-GREEN’s personnel have extensive training and experience in the handling and transport of hazardous materials.  

           

It is possible under the Public Assistance Program that right of entry onto private property may be authorized by FEMA.  In that event, specialty “PPDR” or “ROE” crews will be developed and employed in accordance with the desires of the Client and within the confines of the project worksheet approved by FEMA.  It is important to understand that before performing any work on private property, a proper survey and documentation of the hazard is necessary to ensure eligibility for reimbursement.  Photographic evidence of the condition of the property prior to and after services are rendered are essential. 

           

One other aspect of the debris mission is an effective public announcement and public awareness system.  As early as possible, and using multiple media, the public information officer should publish guidelines regarding the segregation and placement of debris on the right of way.  Debris should always be placed, whenever possible, between the sidewalk and the curb.  It should never be placed close to the trunks of trees, on or close to mailboxes, on or on top of fire hydrants or on water meters.  AMERI-GREEN can assist in preparing flyers, brochures and public assistance announcements in this regard.  (See Pre-Event Planning Section).

           

AMERI-GREEN is well known for its ability to manage and organize its assets in performance of the debris mission.  AMERI-GREEN employs the National Incident Management System and Incident Command System unity of command and change of command principles.  More particularly, each area or sector, defined geographically, will have a designated manager or supervisor in charge.  The operations manager, who reports to the project manager, oversees these supervisors.  The area supervisors are responsible for the crews working in their designated sectors or zones.  While NIMS/ICS suggest a ratio of 1 to 5 or 1 to 7, the USACE recommended 1 to 10 crews per supervisor has been adopted in debris missions. Each of these supervisors will also have training in quality control and safety and will be equipped with substantial communication capability.